African Americans, Slavery, and Islam

Tuesday

Ramachandra B. Abhyankar got another of his "letters to the editor" printed in the May 27, 2012 Tribune Star (Terre Haute, Indiana).

http://tribstar.com/opinion/x1561293081/READERS-FORUM-May-27-2012

 Well done, Ramachandra! Here's the letter:

African Americans, slavery and Islam

Many African Americans in the United States have renounced Christianity and embraced Islam, in protest against the enslavement of their ancestors by white Christians in America when slavery was legal in America. This is ironic because Islam supports slavery. The enslavement of Africans under Islam is not only a historical fact, but is something that continues today, in some parts of Africa, and some Islamic countries, since Sharia (Islamic Law) supports slavery.

Historically, Islam has enslaved members of all races.

• The enslavement of Black Africans by Islam is described in the book “Islam's Black Slaves: The Other Black Diaspora” by Ronald Segal

• The enslavement of white Christians from Europe by Islam is described in the book “Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters: White Slavery in the Mediterranean, the Barbary Coast and Italy, 1550-1800” by Robert C. Davis

• The enslavement of Hindus by Islam is described in the book “Muslim slave system in Medieval India” by K.S. Lal

The enslavement of Jews in Islam started from the time of the Prophet of Islam. All unarmed adult male members (about 800 in number) of the Jewish tribe of Banu Qurayza, who had surrendered, were beheaded and their women and children were sold into slavery in Medina by Muslims in 627 A.D., in the presence of the Prophet of Islam. The Prophet of Islam made no attempt to stop these killings of unarmed Jewish men and the enslavement of the women and children of the Jews.

In fact, Islam has sustained slavery for 1,400 years, since Sharia (Islamic Law) supports slavery.

— Ramachandra B. Abhyankar
Terre Haute

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A Less Disturbing Way to Talk About the Disturbing Nature of Islam

Friday

Terrorism works. Islam is the bully of planet Earth. They say we must either join their gang or pay them money and if we don’t do what they say, they'll hurt us or even kill us. They mean business. Jihadists will commit suicide to terrorize the world into submission. Sharia law seeks to destroy our democracy and take away our freedom of speech and thought and religion. They mutilate the genitals of their little girls, kill their own wives and daughters to retain their “honor” and their women are second class, subordinated sex slaves. Sharia law says it’s okay for a man to have sex with girls as young as nine as long as he marries her first. They are taking over the world, infiltrating governments and the U.N., willing to die and kill for Allah, and they've been at it for 1400 years.

Okay, stop for a moment. How do you feel having read that? It’s upsetting for non-Muslims to hear about Islam. The information makes us angry because orthodox Islam is encroaching into our lives. This kind of information can make you feel afraid because you see what's happening in places like Europe and see the same thing beginning in the U.S. The facts can overwhelm people and leave them depressed and defeated and wanting to give up.

This is my point: When you tell someone a disturbing truth about Islam, you will make them feel bad. This is not good for your relationship. And if you’re not careful about how you share this information, you will harm the bonds you have with your family and friends. It happens all the time.

This is the real problem: People need to know what’s happening, but we can’t count on the media or the government to keep us informed — so we need to connect in other ways. We need our relationships. We need to be joined together to make strong organizations to battle the aggressive encroachment of orthodox Islam.

But talking about Islam is upsetting, so people avoid bringing it up, and when they do, it often leads to upsets. We end up arguing with each other or avoiding each other or lying to keep the peace. And all these ways of coping with the upset strain and drain your relationships. Islam drains your time and your relationships just because it is so terribly hard to discuss without getting upset.

But we need to keep talking about it. Everyone must know what is happening. So we keep trying to get through to them even though it keeps causing upsets. Sometimes people actually listen, but often it’s just too much for them and if you keep trying, they will stop talking to you altogether. When you're upset, you prevent the transfer of information.

Jihadis not only blow up buildings, but talking about jihad can cause your relationship to blow up. So what can you do?

First, don’t try to share the truth when you’re upset. It needs to be shared, but not while you feel bad. Nobody likes being around you when you’re upset. You need a change of attitude and a better strategy for sharing what you know. You can accomplish both with one thing: When you feel bad, do some good.

If you want to talk about Islam and share what you know, you first must get busy doing something about it. You can’t let yourself just absorb information. You can’t let yourself just watch orthodox Islam’s war on the free world unfold. If you don’t find something to do, the knowledge alone will destroy your happiness, your dreams, and your relationships.

You must become a citizen warrior and do something productive to fight for freedom. Why? Because only in taking an action will you grow strong. Only in doing something can you improve your mood. But it doesn't have to be a big thing. It doesn’t matter much how big of a step you take on. It only matters that you are moving forward.

Go to WhatYouCanDoAboutIslam.com and find something you can do. You could join ACT! for America or even start a chapter. You could get a conversion kit for your car so you can burn ethanol and stop sending money to OPEC and into the bank accounts of those who fund the global jihad. You could write one letter or send an email asking your members of Congress to co-sponsor the Open Fuel Standard and break oil’s monopoly over transportation. You could find out what your child’s textbooks say about Islam. It almost doesn’t matter what you decide to do. It only matters that you are taking action.

Taking action does two important things. First it makes you feel better. Action takes you out of the state of being a victim where this terrible thing is happening to you, and psychologically puts you into the state of being a cause, an initiator — acting upon rather than being acted upon.

This shift from victim to cause makes a big difference emotionally. Every time you're upset, find a small step you can take. It will bring relief. It will strengthen you. A terrible thing is happening in the world, but there are hundreds of ways to do something about it. You could support women’s rights. You could volunteer time to a leader who is fighting the good fight. Look around your world. Look at your family, your kids. What would you do to save the world for them?

The instant you begin, your attitude will shift. You are doing your part. You will feel satisfaction. You will feel good about yourself. Doing something about orthodox Islam's relentless encroachment will strengthen you and make you feel better.

But the second benefit of taking action is to give you a way to talk about Islam indirectly. Now you can tell people what you’re doing. People love to hear stories about what people are doing. They will turn toward you, not away from you. Then, as you tell them what you’re doing, you can tell them why you’re doing it.

For example: We bought a kit for our car that was pretty easy to install, making our car capable of burning E85. Now we’re trying to get more sources of ethanol here locally. When people want to know why we’re doing this, we tell them how OPEC controls the price of oil and one fourth of all gas dollars go to nations who hate freedom and repress and abuse women. And we don't want to lavish money on them any more.

When you share what you're doing, it is easy to talk about why you’re doing it. And you're sharing it as a story about what you are doing and why. This is a much easier conversation to have. Even if they don't agree with you (or even like what you’re doing) it makes for a much less upsetting interaction.

Then, make sure when you talk about Islam that you always couple information with possible actions they could take. Knowledge and action must go together.

So this is the easy way to talk to people about the disturbing nature of Islam: When the truth upsets you, take an action to do some good. When you do something good, share that with people and let them know why you’re doing it. When you tell them why, suggest ways they could help. Ask them to join you. Always nudge people toward taking action. Help them take a small step forward. If it makes them feel upset when they hear about the disturbing nature of Islam, encourage them to do a bit of good so they will feel better and, in turn, encourage them to share what they are doing and why they are doing it.

Hesiod wrote: "If thou shouldst lay up even a little upon a little, and shouldst do this often, soon would even this become great."

Summary:

  • Don’t share while you’re upset.
  • Take a small action to do some good and you will feel better.
  • Share what you’re doing and why you’re doing it.
  • Encourage others to help you or join you. They can share with others and tell those people why they are doing what they’re doing and suggest ways those people could help.

Read more...

Is it Racist to Criticize Islam?

Sunday

Is Ayaan Hirsi Ali a racist? She was born in Somalia, from which she escaped to avoid an arranged marriage, and she eventually became a member of Parliament in the Netherlands.

She helped produce a film with Theo Van Gogh which criticized Islam's treatment of women. Van Gogh was shot to death by a Muslim in retaliation, and a note was pinned to his chest with a knife — a note that threatened Ayaan Hirsi Ali.


She made her way to the United States, and has since written two books critical of Islam: Infidel and Nomad: From Islam to America: A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations.


Is Wafa Sultan a racist? She was born and raised in Syria, and was trained as a psychiatrist.


On February 21, 2006, she took part in an Al Jazeera discussion program, arguing with the hosts about Samuel P. Huntington's Clash of Civilizations theory. A six-minute composite video of her response was widely circulated on blogs and through email. The New York Times estimated it was seen at least one million times. In the video she criticized Muslims for treating non-Muslims differently, and for not recognizing the accomplishments of Jews and other non-Muslims. The video was the most-discussed video of all time with over 260,000 comments on YouTube.

Is Ibn Warraq a racist? Warraq was born in India to Muslim parents who migrated to Pakistan after the partitioning of British Indian Empire.


Warraq founded the Institute for the Secularisation of Islamic Society. He is a senior research fellow at the Center for Inquiry, focusing on Quranic criticism.

Warraq is the author of seven books, including Why I Am Not a Muslim and Leaving Islam. He has spoken at the United Nations "Victims of Jihad" conference organized by the International Humanist and Ethical Union alongside speakers such as Bat Ye'or, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and Simon Deng.

Is Tapan Ghosh a racist? The president of Hindu Samhati, he speaks all over India and the United States about the ongoing Islamic invasion of West Bengal.


In an article about him, a correspondent wrote, "A life of 25 years of relentless service has strengthened the resolve of Tapan Ghosh to unite Hindu masses to fight against injustice and the oppressive attitude of the authorities in the face of ever-increasing Islamist aggression."


Ghosh said, "As someone who has suffered enormously from the Islamist onslaught in eastern India, both after the partition of India as well as the partition of erstwhile Pakistan to form Bangladesh, Islamic terrorism has deeply affected my life and the life of millions in the Indian subcontinent. The horrific events of 1971 where nearly 3 million Bengalis, mostly Hindus were exterminated by the Pakistani military regime left an everlasting impression on me. Since then, I have worked relentlessly for the service and upliftment of people reeling under the scourge of radical Islam."

Is Seyran Ates a racist? Born in Turkey of Kurdish parents, and now working as a lawyer in Germany, Atest is highly critical of an immigrant Muslim society that is often more orthodox than its counterpart in Turkey, and her criticisms have put her at risk.


Her book, "Islam Needs a Sexual Revolution," was scheduled for publication in Germany in 2009. In an interview in January 2008 on National Public Radio, Ates stated that she was in hiding and would not be working on Muslim women's behalf publicly (including in court) due to the threats against her.


Ates is the author of the article, Human Rights Before Religion: Have we forgotten to protect women in our bid to accommodate practices carried out in the name of Islam?

Is Francis Bok a racist? Francis Piol Bol Bok, born in Sudan, was a slave for ten years but is now an abolitionist and author living in the United States.


On May 15, 1986, Bok was captured and enslaved at age seven during an Islamic militia raid on the village of Nymlal. Slavery is a standard feature of orthodox Islam. Bok lived in bondage for ten years before escaping imprisonment in Kurdufan, followed by a journey to the United States by way of Cairo, Egypt. Read more of his story here.


Bok's autobiography, Escape from Slavery, chronicles his life from his early youth and his years in captivity, to his work in the United States as an abolitionist.

Is Nonie Darwish a racist? Now an American, she grew up a Muslim in Egypt, the daughter of an Egyptian general whose family was part of President Nasser’s inner circle.


Darwish founded Former Muslims United with Ibn Warraq, an organization dedicated, in part, to helping Muslims reject the inherent intolerance, violence, and supremacism in their doctrine.


Darwish is the author of two books critical of Islam, Cruel and Usual Punishment: The Terrifying Global Implications of Islamic Law, and Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror.


And she is an outspoken critic of Sharia law.

Is Brigitte Gabriel a racist? She's an Arab, born in Lebanon. Gabriel watched her country become an Islamic state. Lebanon was a Christian country and "the jewel of the Middle East" when she was young. But the Muslims in Lebanon, supported by Syria and Iran, slowly became more militant until they turned the country into a war zone.


She made her way to America only to find, to her horror, the Muslim Brotherhood here in her newly adopted country, going down the same road. She decided to warn her fellow Americans about the dire results you can expect from appeasing orthodox Muslims, so she founded ACT! for America, a grassroots organization dedicated to educating the public about Islam's prime directive.


Gabriel is the author of two books, They Must Be Stopped: Why We Must Defeat Radical Islam and How We Can Do It, and Because They Hate: A Survivor of Islamic Terror Warns America.

Is Mark Gabriel a racist? Born in Egypt, he became an Islamic scholar in the Muslim world's most prestigious university. Early fears by relatives that Gabriel would grow up a Christian because he had been breastfed by a Christian woman resulted in him being given a thorough Islamic education. So he grew up immersed in Islamic culture and was sent to Al Azhar school at the age of six.


By the time Gabriel was twelve years old he had memorized the Quran completely. After graduating from Al-Azhar University with a Master's degree, he was offered a position as a lecturer at the university. During his research, which involved travel to Eastern and Western countries, Gabriel became more distant from Islam, finding its history, "from its commencement to date, to be filled with violence and bloodshed without any worthwhile ideology or sense of decency. I asked myself 'What religion would condone such destruction of human life?' Based on that, I began to see that the Muslim people and their leaders were perpetrators of violence."


On hearing that Gabriel had "forsaken Islamic teachings" the authorities of Al Azhar expelled him from the University on 17 December, 1991 and asked for him to be released from the post of Imam in the mosque of Amas Ebn Malek in Giza city. The Egyptian secret police then seized Gabriel and placed him in a cell without food and water for three days, after which he was tortured and interrogated for four days before being transferred to Calipha prison in Cairo and released without charge a week later. He escaped Egypt and has since written several books, including, Islam and Terrorism.

Is Walid Shoebat a racist? He's a Palestinian immigrant to the United States and a former PLO militant. Shoebat was born in Bethlehem, the grandson of the Mukhtar of Beit Sahour, an associate of Grand Mufti of Jerusalem. In 1993, Shoebat converted to Christianity after studying the Jewish Bible for six months in response to a challenge from his wife, initially trying to persuade her to convert to Islam.


After the September 11 attacks in 2001, Shoebat began to criticize Islam publicly. He has appeared on mainstream media around the world and has been an expert witness on a number of documentaries on orthodox Islam.


Shoebat argues that parallels exist between radical Islam and Nazism. He says, "Secular dogma like Nazism is less dangerous than Islamofascism that we see today...because Islamofascism has a religious twist to it; it says 'God the Almighty ordered you to do this'...It is trying to grow itself in fifty-five Muslim states. So potentially, you could have a success rate of several Nazi Germanys, if these people get their way."

Is Simon Deng a racist? He was born in southern Sudan. His village of Tonga was a peaceful farming community, despite frequent raids by the Islamic Sudanese army where they burned huts and scattered livestock. "One of the first things I was told as a child — if the Arab men come, just run for your life," Deng recalls. The history of Arab colonization of Africa is one of Islamization, wholesale slave trading, and genocide. One day the Muslims came, and Deng was captured and enslaved.


At the age of 12, he noticed a man from his village due to the man's "shilluk" — a series of raised welts across the forehead. It's a tribal marking Deng has also. The man summoned a distant relative of Deng's who happened to be nearby. With his kinsman's help, the boy was able to escape.


Having escaped slavery and emigrated to the United States, Deng travels the country addressing audiences which range from the United Nations to middle school students. His speeches focus on education and the anti-slavery movement. Deng is now a warner of the horrors of unchecked Islam and Sharia. "I was victimized in the name of Islam," he says.

Is Babu Suseelan a racist? Born in India, Professor Babu Suseelan is a Hindu leader, a human rights activist, a university professor, and a psychologist. He is also the Director of Indian American Intellectuals Forum, New York.


Suseelan is the author of several published articles on jihadi terrorism and cognitive psychology. He has been an invited speaker at international conferences on Islamic militancy.


He speaks around the world, trying to educate people about orthodox Islam and the danger it poses to the free world.

Is Walid Phares a racist? Phares was born in Lebanon, where he earned degrees in law, political science and sociology. He then earned a Master's degree in International Law from the Université de Lyon in France and a Ph.D. in international relations and strategic studies from the University of Miami. He emigrated to the United States in 1990.


Phares has testified before committees of the U.S. State, Justice, Defense and Homeland Security Departments, the United States Congress, the European Parliament, the United Nations Security Council.

His writings expose the political nature embedded in Islamic doctrine, and seeks to find solutions to the problems that presents the West. His books include, The Confrontation: Winning the War against Future Jihad, and The War of Ideas: Jihadism against Democracy.

Is Zeyno Baran a racist? Baran is a Turkish-American scholar and Director of the Center for Eurasian Policy.


One of Baran's key areas of specialization is countering the spread of radical Turkish Islamist ideology in Europe and Eurasia.


Baran has criticized European and American governments for working too closely with groups or individuals that espouse an Islamist ideology. She argues that such engagement actually works against U.S. and European interests.


Baran recently wrote an article for The Weekly Standard on this very subject. In it, she advocates a kind of "litmus test" for deciding who and what type of Muslim groups the U.S. government should engage with. Baran argues that "the deciding factor must be ideology: Is the group Islamist or not?" She believes that the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizbullah, and Hizb ut-Tahrir fail her test.

Is M. Zuhdi Jasser a racist? He's the President and Founder of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy. A devout Muslim, Jasser founded AIFD in the wake of the 9/11 attacks on the United States as an effort to provide an American Muslim voice advocating for the preservation of the founding principles of the United States Consitution, liberty and freedom, and the separation of mosque and state.


A former Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy, Jasser served 11 years as a medical officer. He is a nationally recognized expert in the contest of ideas against Political Islam and American Islamist organizations. On October 1, 2009, Jasser briefed members of Congress on the threat of Political Islam. He regularly briefs members of the House and Senate congressional anti-terror caucuses.

Is Magdi Allam a racist? Allam was born in Egypt and raised by Muslim parents. His mother Safeya was a believing and practicing Muslim, whereas his father Muhammad was "completely secular." He became a journalist and outspoken critic of "Islamic extremism."


In 2005, Allam published an article calling for a ban on building mosques in Italy. In a piece accusing mosques of fostering hate, he claimed Italy is suffering from "mosque-mania."


In a public letter to the editor, Allam stated that Islam was inseparable from Islamic extremism. Criticising Islam itself, rather than Islamic extremism, Allam argued: "I asked myself how it was possible that those who, like me, sincerely and boldly called for a 'moderate Islam,' assuming the responsibility of exposing themselves in the first person in denouncing Islamic extremism and terrorism, ended up being sentenced to death in the name of Islam on the basis of the Quran. I was forced to see that, beyond the contingency of the phenomenon of Islamic extremism and terrorism that has appeared on a global level, the root of evil is inherent in an Islam that is physiologically violent and historically conflictive."

Is Farshad Kholghi a racist? Born in Iran, he remembers the time before the Islamic Revolution, when Shah Reza Palahvi reigned supreme and the country was on a staunch Western direction, with extensive developments in infrastructure, industry, education, and health care.


Farshad Kholghi is a well known figure from public debates in Denmark. As is the case for most everyone debating Islam, he has been accused of racism (which, given his ethnicity, is ironic), and of presenting "right-wing" political views. 
Farshad rhetorically inquired: "Is it 'right-wing' to stand for womens' rights? Is it 'right-wing' to criticize religion? Is it 'right-wing' to defend freedom of expression? Is it 'right-wing' to defend the right of the individual over that of the ideology? If so, then yes, I present right-wing political views.


Farshad strongly encourages participating in public debate, to not fear religious fanaticism, but rather to ridicule them and their abuse of power through the application of the best of Western values, including open discussion, scrutiny of Islamic organizations and the healthy tradition of satire and ridicule of hypocritical, corrupt and exploitative religious leaders.

Is Bassam Tibi a racist? Born in Syria, Tibi is now a German citizen. He is a Muslim and a political scientist and Professor of International Relations. Tibi is a staunch critic of Islamism and an advocate of reforming Islam itself. In academia, he is known for his analysis of international relations and the introduction of Islam to the study of international conflict and of civilization.


Tibi had eighteen visiting professorships in all continents. Tibi was visiting senior fellow at Yale University when he retired in 2009. The same year, he published his life's work, a book entitled, Islam's Predicament with Cultural Modernity.

Is Khaled Abu Toameh a racist? Toameh was born in the West Bank in 1963 to an Israeli Arab father and a Palestinian Arab mother. He received his BA in English Literature from the Hebrew University and lives in Jerusalem with his wife and three children.


Toameh was formerly a senior reporter for The Jerusalem Report, and a correspondent for Al-Fajr, which he describes as a mouthpiece for the PLO. He has produced several documentaries on the Palestinians for the BBC, Channel 4, Australian, Danish and Swedish TV, including ones that exposed the connection between Arafat and payments to the armed wing of Fatah, as well as the financial corruption within the Palestinian Authority.


He was the first journalist to report about the sex scandal that rocked the Palestinian Authority in early 2010 and which led to the firing of Rafiq Husseini, Chief of Staff for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. The scandal was revealed by former Palestinian intelligence official Fahmi Shabaneh in an exclusive interview with Toameh in The Jerusalem Post. One of Toameh's more famous articles is, Where Are the Voices of "Moderate" Muslims?

Is Tawfik Hamid a racist? He was born in Egypt and became a member of the militant Islamic organization, al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya. After a change of heart, Hamid started to preach in mosques to promote a message of peace, which made him a target of Islamic militants who threatened his life. Hamid then migrated to the West where he has lectured at UCLA, Stanford University, University of Miami and Georgetown University against Islamic fundamentalism.


In a 2009 Wall Street Journal article, Hamid said that Islam should prove it's a religion of peace, and called Islamic scholars and clerics, "to produce a Shariah book that will be accepted in the Islamic world and that teaches that Jews are not pigs and monkeys, that declaring war to spread Islam is unacceptable, and that killing apostates is a crime."


Hamid has written opinion pieces for The Wall Street Journal, including Islam Needs To Prove It's A Religion Of Peace, How to End Islamophobia and The Trouble with Islam.



Okay, this list of prominent critics of Islam could go on indefinitely. If you think criticizing Islam is racist, can you tell me exactly what race they are all criticizing? Of course not. Calling criticism of Islam "racist" is a manipulative, underhanded slander. The accurate name is "critic." All the people above are engaged in religious criticism, criticism of an ideology, and political commentary, all of which are desirable, necessary, vital components of a free society.

Some people who criticize Islam are racists. That does not mean criticizing Islam is racism. It's also true that some people who criticize Islam are socialists, but it would be foolish to say criticizing Islam is socialism.

Islam is not a race. There are Muslims of every race. The largest Muslim country is Indonesia. There are more non-Arab Muslims than Arab Muslims. Criticism of Islam is not racism.


Most people trying to silence criticism of Islam know full well Islam is not a race. But the slander is effective in the free world. The mere implication can ruin a political career or get someone fired. So while it's not true — and most people saying it know it's not true — it is an effective weapon of censorship nontheless.


I hope this list, once and for all, will make anyone who says "criticizing Islam is racist" look ridiculous. I hope this removes that absurd slur from public conversation forevermore. Am I hoping for too much? Every time you read or hear anyone using "racism" to silence criticism of Islam, respond with this list and see what happens.

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How To Get Past Someone's Multiculturalist Defenses

Thursday

WHEN YOU begin talking about Islam with a multiculturalist, you will immediately run headlong into a wall of resistance. But you can soften their defenses if you immediately make the following perfectly clear:

1. You are against racism, and if people understood more about Islam, it would prevent racism.

2. You are not criticizing Muslims, you are criticizing the political and religious doctrine of Islam.

3. Until your listener has read the Koran for herself, she really doesn't know what's going on. And if you have read the Koran, make it a point to mention that relevant fact.

Work these into the early part of your conversation and you will have a much more willing listener. Listen to me: Multiculturalists are the people we most need to reach. Please do not write them off. These are the people we are not reaching, and there are millions of them. They could be our allies, but their wall must be penetrated. Hammer those three points adamantly up front, and you may well find yourself with an open mind to talk to.

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You Must Accept My Religion

Friday

The following is the text of the newest flyer (read more about the flyer here).

I may have been dead for over 1000 years but I am still very much alive.

I told my people I was a prophet — in fact, not just any prophet but the last one. Posing as a prophet is really very simple. First and foremost you have to believe in yourself. Then people will start to believe in you. The more people who believe in you, the more others can be persuaded to believe in you. It snowballs. Today I still live through my followers and the rules I gave them to live by.

What is my religion? My religion is my ambition.

My ambition was to dominate all the peoples of the world and to have them all living by my rules. I wanted total obedience. I wanted to be praised and revered by everyone on earth. I was careful to cover my ambition in the cloak of religion so that my authority had the backing of the Almighty. Who would dare disobey me then?

The cloak of religion has served me very well. It has inspired my credulous followers to kill and be killed in the service of my ambition; it has allowed them to cast their bloodshed in the light of holiness.

My religion only demands one thing: TOTAL OBEDIENCE. Obey my rules and serve my ambition and you will be rewarded, in this life and the next.

My followers are busy working to enforce my rules across the whole world today. They call this their religion. They do this in all manner of ways: by persuading, persecuting, cajoling, threatening, soothing, confusing, bullying, terrorising, silencing, migrating, breeding — whatever it takes to spread my religion and ensure it becomes dominant.

The main purpose of my religion is to destroy all other religions.

“So what are your rules?” I hear you ask. Very well, here are my life or death rules:

1) If you reject my religion, then you must be fought — to the death.

2) If you leave my religion, you must be killed.

3) If you mock, insult, or work against my religion you must be killed.

4) If you die fighting for my religion you will go straight to paradise.

Remember that total obedience is the only measure of devotion to me. If you follow my rules without question you will be rewarded. Even when my rules demand cruelty or ferocity, you must obey. In fact, your willingness to do what you would rather not do is the best sign that you are obedient and thus truly devoted to my religion.

Everything you do must proclaim the same message: “Accept my religion or else!” This is my message and this is the message of my followers. Watch them carefully; they always bear the same message.

Today my ambition is enjoying remarkable success. Everywhere my followers go they simply have to say they must be allowed to do this or that because it is their religion and the unbelievers fall over themselves to allow it — even when it secretly disgusts them.

For all the technical wizardry of these modern unbelievers, I must say they are the greatest fools I have ever seen. Their biggest weakness is that they want peace. This makes them easy people to conquer. My followers just have to threaten disorder and the unbelievers find a sneaky way to concede defeat. The violence of my followers terrifies the unbelievers into paralysis and submission. There are a few among the unbelievers who have become alarmed but they are ignored or vilified.

In fact, when my followers murder some unbelievers due to some trivial insult, these foolish cowards come to them with grovelling apologies and promises to punish anyone else who offends my religion: my religion, which hangs over them like a death sentence! They truly are the most ridiculous people. I think they will sell their own children into slavery for the sake of a little more “peace”.

My soldiers only have to use words like “justice”, “liberation”, “freedom” and the unbelievers will send their armies to help them. But my followers have no intention of creating “liberty”, it’s against my religion. Nor do the unbelievers understand what I mean by “justice”. They are too lazy to find out!

I have nothing but contempt for these people. They are weak and cowardly and stupid.

These fools think that by tolerating my religion they are accepting it. This will do for now because it allows my followers to gather strength, but in the long run it will not suffice. To accept my religion is to obey my rules and just tolerating my religion is not obeying my rules. If they refuse to obey my rules, they are rejecting my religion and must be fought — to the death. That is rule number one.

Read more...

America's First Encounter With Jihad

The following is an excerpt from Richard Hobbs' new book, Death By a Thousand Cuts:

After declaring our independence from England, our merchant ships lost the protection of the Royal Navy. The Turkish Ottoman Empire had lost control of North Africa and Barbary Pirates seized our ships, enslaved our crews, and demanded tribute. Nearly a million white slaves had been taken over the years.

Our representatives in Europe at the time were John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson. The Barbary Pirates became a serious concern and Adams and Jefferson met with the ambassador from the Bey of Algiers. Ambassador Abdul al-Rahman told them that Allah directed in the Qur'an that all unbelievers were sinners and, if they did not convert, they should be made slaves. Ever the scholar, Jefferson obtained a Qur'an to better understand the foe.

"The Muslims never called their naval raiders 'Barbary Pirates.' They called them 'ghazis,' sacred raiders...actually jihad by the army of Muhammad." - Bill Warner

The navy we had established during the War for Independence had been disbanded so we had no force to take on the pirates. We were paying large sums in tribute, eventually exceeding 10 percent of the country's budget and increasing. At that time we were developing our constitution since the Articles of Confederation had proven inadequate. One of the arguments for a strong federal government was that we needed a federal navy. The US Navy was formed in 1794.

When Thomas Jefferson became president, one of his early acts was to send the navy to deal with the Barbary Pirates.

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The Embedded Assumption that Islam is a Religion of Peace

Wednesday

In an article entitled A Rare Look at Secretive Brotherhood in America, the author said:

"Many Muslims believe that the Brotherhood is a noble international movement that supports the true teachings of Islam and unwaveringly defends Muslims who have come under attack around the world, from Chechens to Palestinians to Iraqis. But others view it as an extreme organization that breeds intolerance and militancy."

I had to read those two sentences again. The problem is, those are the same sentences. It's like someone writing, "Some people believe Mohammad was violent. But others think he merely tortured and killed people."

It's like, "What?"

Of course, the embedded assumption here is that the "true teachings of Islam" cannot possibly breed "intolerance and militancy." And yet the true teachings of Islam — if you mean by "true" the teachings written in the Koran and Hadith — breed exactly that: Intolerance toward non-Muslims (and Muslims insufficiently Islamic) and militancy.

Read more...

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Article Spotlight

One of the most unusual articles on CitizenWarrior.com is Pleasantville and Islamic Supremacism.

It illustrates the Islamic Supremacist vision by showing the similarity between what happened in the movie, Pleasantville, and what devout fundamentalist Muslims are trying to create in Islamic states like Syria, Pakistan, or Saudi Arabia (and ultimately everywhere in the world).

Click here to read the article.


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