Do You Know Muslims Who Are Really Nice People?

Monday

It's really not that hard,
so it doesn't mean anything.
For years I've been working with many people from many different countries, including several Muslims. One Muslim in particular is a very nice guy, a hard worker, and a mature leader. He is a very likable person.

While I was working with him, he was always listening to the Koran on his headphones. Most reasonable people, I think, would point to him as an example of how wrong it is to say that Islam is bad or potentially dangerous. I mean look at this guy. He's a perfectly nice man.

He is originally from Africa, but he lives in the United States, he's not married, and he has 15 children from four different women, and works a fairly low-paying job. And recently he was arrested and convicted of two counts of statutory rape.

Now here's my point: Just because you know a nice Muslim doesn't mean Islam is a benevolent ideology. Just because you know a nice Muslim or ten nice Muslims, it does not follow that Islam is an benign ideology. When someone is nice, it doesn't tell you what they believe or what they're capable of. "Nice" just means they know how to behave in a way that people like.

Even beyond that, someone can be a perfectly nice person and still believe that the prophet Muhammad was an apostle of the Almighty and brought true teachings to mankind which say it's right and good for a man to have four wives, and it's right and good to have sex with girls as young as nine years old.

If he accepts Islamic ideology in its entirety, he would not feel guilty about any of this. In fact, he would feel good about it because he is following the example of the prophet himself (and it says 91 times in the Koran that a good Muslim should follow Muhammad's example).

And Islamic doctrine includes the obligation to bring all people in the world under the rule of Islamic law, and includes the justification of using force to accomplish that goal. It is all one unified ideology and it explicitly says there is no "picking and choosing." In other words, a Muslim must follow the whole thing.

And it would be perfectly acceptable to an entire panel of the most authoritative Islamic scholars in the world to do all of that while being likable.

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Did Muhammad Teach Love?

Tuesday

On Facebook, someone asked this question: "Did Muhammad teach love but over the centuries people took his words out of context?"

Here was my answer: No, Muhammad didn't teach love. But over the centuries, because human beings are generally empathetic, many Muslims ignored Muhammad's teachings and treated non-Muslims kindly.

But times are changing. Saudi Arabia has been using its vast oil wealth to spread fundamentalism around the world, funding new mosques and madrasas by the thousands, all of them teaching straight, unadulterated Islam, which says that the law of Allah (Sharia) is the only legitimate law in the world, and the goal of Islam is to eventually bring all people under the rule of Sharia.

According to Islam, this mission is to be accomplished by first just inviting the unbelievers to embrace Islam, as Osama bin Laden did before he attacked America on 9/11. If the unbelievers don't embrace Islam, Muslims are ordered by Allah to make war against them if they have the strength to do it. Once victorious, they are to give the unbelievers one last chance to become a Muslim (or for Christians and Jews, become a dhimmi), or die.

This system has worked. Fifty-six countries in the world are ruled by Islamic law. The OIC (Organization of Islamic Cooperation) is the largest organization in the world other than the United Nations, and it is the largest voting bloc in the UN.

Muslims are now migrating to all non-Muslim nations. And they bring their ideology with them.

Someone then said, "I don't understand how people follow this. How hard is it to just accept other people? I don't get it. I enjoy being nice. It's rewarding."

This is how I answered him: Yes, being kind to people is enjoyable. But imagine a Muslim raised to believe the Koran is the word of the Almighty. And that Muhammad is the final prophet of the Almighty. And you know that Muhammad said that the law of Allah (Sharia law) is the only legitimate law. All other systems of law are man-made and therefore misguided and evil.

And imagine what it would be like if you thought Allah gave each Muslim a mission: Bring all people under the rule of Allah. And by the way, it's okay to use force because these unbelievers don't know what's good for them. They're going to suffer terrible torment in eternity anyway, so you might as well try to make them into believers, even against their will.

That's the way it is. And it has been causing problems for humanity for 1400 years. Is the solution simply to be nice to someone who believes such an ideology? What can be done about it? That's the question we should all be asking. What can we do about it that is compassionate and yet not foolish?

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Muslims Mass-Murdering Non-Muslims is Not News

Sunday

Sri Lanka Easter Bombing, 2019
When non-Muslims kill Muslims for being Muslim, it is news around the world, and talked about for weeks. But Muslims slaughtering non-Muslims? That's just business as usual. It's like saying, "207 million pounds of air pollution went into the air today, as it does every day." It's not news. Not many people talk about it. Ho hum.

I know that it's also true that non-Muslims feel weird talking about Muslims murdering people for being non-Muslims. It feels discriminatory to talk about it. Racist, even. And some are, of course, concerned about what others will think of them.

And I know many people — politicians, journalists, etc. — are hesitant to speak openly or honestly about the incessant murder of non-Muslims because it's ugly, controversial, job-threatening, and unfashionable. But I think it's worth pointing out that it's also nothing out of the ordinary. Muslims murdering non-Muslims goes on all the time, and has been happening for fourteen centuries.

I am hoping that you still find opportunities where you can to educate your fellow non-Muslims about Islam. And I thought this idea might be something you can work into your conversations where appropriate: So much to-do is made when Muslims are murdered simply because they're Muslims because it is rare. And people hardly mention it when non-Muslims are murdered by Muslims for being non-Muslims, partly because it happens all the time.

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What's the Difference Between a Habit and a Headscarf?

Saturday

Why are some people vehemently against a Muslim headscarf but have no objection to a nun's habit? What's the difference?

The main difference is the ideology represented by the clothing. Islam's ideology is 51 percent political and only 49 percent religious. That is, 51 percent of the Koran is about what Muslims should do with non-Muslims.

A Muslim is obligated to strive to establish the law of Allah in all nations, imposing it against the will of non-Muslims if necessary. Islamic law is very detailed and specific, and includes the death penalty for apostates and gays, women are legally only worth a half a man, etc. The Muslim headscarf is one of the few visible signs of a commitment to the fundamental principles of Islam. That's why people are bothered by it.

But aren't Christians obliged to "establish the rule of Christ in all nations?" Isn't a nun's habit a visible sign of commitment to the fundamental principles of Christianity?

That's seems like a legitimate counter-argument, but are there "Christian countries?" That is, a country where the "laws of Christianity" are imposed on everyone in that country?

So far, there are 58 Muslim countries, and orthodox Muslims are dedicated to expanding that. These countries have joined together to form the largest global organization outside the UN, and they form the largest voting bloc in the UN. They have been pushing to legally impose Islamic blasphemy laws on the entire world, which means legally nobody would be able to have this conversation, even in "free nations." It would be illegal to criticize Islamic doctrine. It is already illegal in many countries.

Islam is having a huge and growing influence on world affairs. Everyone should learn more about this ideology. It isn't like other religions. The closest religion to it is Scientology, and it's not even close.

The assumptions people make about Islam are mostly wrong. But those assumptions are guiding our legal policies, and that is dangerous.

But wait a minute. Doesn't all this only apply to the most extreme and fundamentalist followers of Islam? Wouldn't the views of extreme and fundamentalist Christians be just as disturbing? It isn't fair to paint all Muslims with this same brush, is it? We could say all Scientologists are bad people, but that isn't the case either.

First of all, we're not talking about Muslims. We're talking about Islam, which is a set of written documents. It is a written ideology. When we say "orthodox Muslim," we mean someone who follows the principles written in Islamic doctrine. Yes, of course, there are many Muslims who do not follow the doctrine, just as there are Christians who don't follow the written doctrine in the Bible.

But what this argument obscures is that the orthodox Muslims are not misguided. They are doing what it says they must do in their written holy book. It says in the Koran 91 times that a Muslim should follow the example of Muhammad in every aspect. And Muhammad (according to biographies of Muhammad written by Muslims for Muslims) raided caravans, led battles, tortured people, ordered assassinations, and personally oversaw the beheading of 800 Jews. He captured and held slaves. He raped women. He started having sex with his favorite wife when she was nine years old. This is not slanderous rumor aimed to discredit Muhammad. This is taught with a straight face in Islamic universities, without any hint of embarrassment. This was the messenger of Allah and he could do no wrong.

A fundamentalist is one who follows the teachings closely. So the actual teachings make a big difference. And all we're saying is that the teachings of Islam are dangerous to non-Muslims. In Islamic doctrine, Muslims are the best of people and non-Muslims are the worst of creatures. This is not a conspiracy theory. This stuff is very easy to find out. You don't have to trust anyone's opinion. Just read the Koran. The Muslims who are true believers (orthodox) are counting on people not wanting to know.

In a conversation about this the other day, someone brought up a good example: the Amish. They have special dress and customs but they don't seek to impose it on anyone else. That's the difference. And it's a big difference.

Look up the Holy Land Foundation trial. The FBI raided the house of a member of the Muslim Brotherhood in America and found a document laying out their plan for our country. So far they have 73 legal organizations in America bent on replacing our laws with Islamic law. One organization has been altering the way Islam is portrayed in school textbooks. One organization puts pressure on Hollywood to make sure Islam is portrayed positively in movies. One organization sues people who try to educate others about what Islam is, or gets them fired from their jobs.

Scientologists aren't bad people, by the way. Most people who read the statements above would think I was slandering Scientologists. But I was talking about Scientology, the ideology. Specifically, I was referring to the "fair game" policy of Scientology. Again, it is a written document, and followed by the true believers. It says that if someone leaves Scientology (becomes an apostate), they are fair game. They can be tricked, lied to, sued, harassed.

But that's not as bad as Islamic doctrine. Islam says the penalty for apostasy is death.

Think about something for a minute. If someone says they're a member of a group that has a written ideology, would you assume they believe in at least some of the tenets of that ideology? Of course. Otherwise, why claim your membership? It's not always the case, of course. Oskar Schindler was a member of the Nazi party, after all.

But if you could choose who would be your next door neighbor or who would date your daughter, would you voluntarily choose someone who claims membership in a dangerous ideology? They might not be "true believers." But on the other hand, many Muslims who were perfectly nice people and not true believers were reached by the more orthodox who educated them on their obligations as a Muslim. They said, "You say you're a Muslim, but have you read the Koran? Do you know what you should be doing?" And they are "radicalized" which is a politically correct way of saying they began following the written doctrine and the example of the founder of Islam.

By the way, I'm not a Christian. I'm not any religion. And I'm not out to slander any particular religion. All I did was read Islamic doctrine and biographies of Muhammad. I wasn't trying to find out that Islam is evil. I just wanted to know what was really true because we've got some people saying it's a religion of peace and some people saying it's a religion of violence. I wanted to know for myself rather than listen to the opinions of others.

I went on a decade-long program of reading, including lots of pro-Islam books and the Koran, which I read twice from beginning to end. It's a fascinating subject to study. Especially the life story of Muhammad. It is completely mind blowing that someone like that founded a religion. And that the religion (the doctrine, not the people) reflects his personality. I would never have believed it, and over time, it has become obvious to me that many people don't believe it and don't want to believe it. But if they want to be well-rounded, if they want to be an educated member of the modern world, it seems to me that one of the things they should really know about is Islam as it is, and not how they wish it was or how others want them to think about it. They should find out for themselves.

Back to the headscarf. The reason people don't like it is that the headscarf says, "I believe in the tenets of Islam" and any non-Muslim who knows what those tenets are will not like them. Also, researchers have discovered that when the women in an area with a high Muslim population begin wearing headscarves, it is a signal that the Muslims in the area are becoming more devout (more "extreme," more fundamentalist). It is a visible sign of increasing devotion to the fundamental principles of Islamic doctrine, which includes an intolerance for non-Muslims and non-Islamic laws, and usually foreshadows violence to non-Muslims and those Muslims who are "insufficiently Islamic." That's why people make such a big deal about Islamic head and face coverings. That's why France and other countries have banned them and many are considering it. 

I personally think it's foolish. If you have a visible sign of growing fundamentalism, why would you ban it? To blind yourself? On the other hand, maybe it would help weaken the fundamentalism. And it would certainly help women be free of the obligation to do it in those countries.

What about the nun's habit? The answer is that being a nun is voluntary. But if a woman is born a Muslim, she is considered a Muslim and the penalty for her leaving Islam is death.

Catholic men are not likely to beat nuns if they don't wear their habits, but orthodox Muslims have been known to beat Muslim and non-Muslim women who don't cover up, and I have yet to read a report of a Catholic man throwing acid into the face of a woman because she was not wearing her habit. Orthodox Muslim men have been doing that to Muslim women in many places in the world.

People who are relatively ignorant of Islam are puzzled by the push toward banning headscarves, and would like to write it off as just ignorant bigotry. But if they looked a little deeper, they might find sensible reasons for it.

Read more...

Think Small Bits and Long Campaigns

Monday

The most important thing a citizen warrior like you can do to help defeat orthodox Islam is to educate and persuade everyone in your circle of influence. Educating and persuading is sometimes delicate business, and the people you talk to may have pre-existing reasons to reject your point of view before you even finish your first sentence. Because of this, it helps if you think in terms of small tidbits of information. A little at a time. And over a long time.

Opinions are usually changed slowly. Over many months, a person can completely change their opinion about something. But an opinion is almost never changed in an argument. In fact, one of the best ways to make someone a passionate believer in what they already believe is to make a really good argument against their opinion, mercilessly attacking it with facts.

But a few interesting facts here and there, casually delivered, interestingly presented, can alter a person's opinion over time without them ever thinking they've been influenced. As far as they are concerned, they changed their own opinion, and that's the best result you can have.

This makes your task much easier than trying to argue with people, or getting into heated debates. All you have to concern yourself with is what interesting fact you can share today.

You get into brief conversations with people all the time. Often they ask you, "What's new?" These are perfect opportunities to mention an interesting tidbit. "I was just reading a book last night by this lady who disguised herself as a Muslim and filmed secret terrorist meetings right here in America. You know what she found?"

Something like that makes a person curious. She or he will want to know more. Or, if not, no big deal. You've planted a little seed.

I've often started great conversations with people by saying something like, "I was reading a book on Muhammad yesterday and I'm totally surprised about something. Muhammad is not like any religious founder I've ever heard of. Did you know he once ordered a Jewish rabbi to be tortured for information about where the rabbi hid some jewels? Or that he personally ordered the beheading of 600 captives? It's amazing! Can you imagine Buddha or Jesus doing something like that?"

It's a tidbit. It often gets a good conversation going. And even if not, you've added a small bit of information that can change an opinion over time, or make someone more open to information in the future — information s/he might have deliberately refused to accept before.

Think in terms of what is interesting. What is surprising? Find good stories that will be interesting for people to hear.

While you're reading or listening to audiobooks or watching DVDs, look for juicy tidbits you can share. Even write them down. Think small. Find something you can say in a couple sentences. Ideally your conversations would be driven by the other person's curiosity. Say something very short and interesting, and let them ask you more about it.

If you have conversations like this with people, over time, some of them will come to think differently about Jihad and about concessions to Islam. You've just added a new voter who is no longer fooled by religious deception (taqiyya).

As you do this, when you find a good, juicy tidbit people really respond to, come back here and add it to the comments on this page. Let's get a good collection we can all use. What tidbits work the best for you?

Read more...

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Article Spotlight

One of the most unusual articles on CitizenWarrior.com is Pleasantville and Islamic Supremacism.

It illustrates the Islamic Supremacist vision by showing the similarity between what happened in the movie, Pleasantville, and what devout fundamentalist Muslims are trying to create in Islamic states like Syria, Pakistan, or Saudi Arabia (and ultimately everywhere in the world).

Click here to read the article.


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